9595A / Server 500 Planar

85, 95, and 3511 Common Devices (Installing drives, memory etc.)
Opening and closing the case
Operator Panel Information

95A Planar
95A Ports and Operator Panel
95A Compatible Complexes
JMP6 Remote Maintenance Processor
J103 Remote Power-ON Request
LogicLock
Power-On Features (Wake-On-Ring, Kickstart, Wake-Up)
Schematic of Audio Stage
Hacking a 95A Planar into a 8595 Case
ADF Sections (PE4FE.ADF)


95A Planar (FRU 92F2623)

This is the most advanced PURE Micro Channel planar. There are none higher.

A1-A4 SIMM sockets Bank A (J65-J68)
B1-B4 SIMM sockets Bank B (J61-J64)
BH1 Battery (CR2032)
F3 Keyboard Fuse
F4-F7 PTC Resistors
J1 Keyboard Port
J2 Mouse Port
J3 Serial Port A (345K)
J4 Serial Port B (345K)
J5 Parallel Port A (ExpressPrint)
J6 Parallel Port B (standard)
J10 Power Supply Connector
J21-J24, J26, J28 32-bit MCA slot
J25 32-bit MCA slot with BVE
J27 32-bit MCA slot with AVE
J29/J30 Processor Complex slot
J43 Op Panel Connector (34-pin)
J44 Floppy Connector (44-pin, 2 keys)
J71 Side Cover Fan Connector
J103 Remote Power-ON Request
JMP1 Password override (J114)
JMP2 Privileged-access password (J119)
JMP3 Cover-interlock (J42)
JMP4 KickStart jumper (J121)
JMP6 Remote maint. service (J45)
U6 LM386 Audio Op Amp (circuit)
U10 14.3181 MHz Osc (adapters)
U14 24.0000 MHz Osc (FDC)
U26 82077SL Floppy Controller
U41 Dallas DS1585S RTC + NVRAM
U43 20.0000 MHz Osc (planar I/O bus?)
U44 92F2384 (ExpressPrint)
U45 22.1184 MHz Osc (UART)
U46 10G4672 (I/O, Interrupt Ctrl.)
U62 ST93C46A 1kbit EEPROM (PAP etc.)
Y1 32.768 KHz Crystal (RTC)

U44 92F2384 drives the ExpressPrint parallel port (A).

U46 10G4672 integrates interrupt controller, and drives most of the external I/O - keyboard and mouse, both serial ports, and the second parallel port (B).

U62 Pin 6 of the ST93C46A EEPROM chip is not grounded, setting it to the 64 word x 16 bits mode. This setting is reflected by the BIOS code.

JMP6 Remote Maintenance Service Connector can be used to add a hardware reset button.

The 9595 planar is a single-side load PCB, meaning there are no components whatsoever on the bottom side, not even passive SMDs.


95A Ports and Operator Panel

95A Ports

COM ports are 345K capable
EP is an ExpressPrint parallel port
LPT is a standard parallel port

95A Operator Panel


95A Compatible Complexes

   Sorry, folks, but personal experience (supported with that of others, BTW) proves that running any other complex but a Type 4 (N, P, Q, or Y) WILL result in a 172 error code. And that's all you will get. The planar is fine. It just won't work. Replace the complex with a Type 4 and it will come up fine...

Tom says:
   The T1-T3 BIOS lacks support for the newer planar. Some of the planar POS registers are organized differently and the older BIOS code will not know how to properly use them. The POST routines are hardcoded, so even if you add the new ADF and other files, it won't change the fact that the POST code is outdated. The T4 BIOS works correctly in both planars, because it checks the planar ID and then does different things based on the returned value.
Additionally the T4 NVRAM rolling bit test has an extra delay in it, so the Dallas DS1585S NVRAM probably has slightly different timing requirements. That would explain the 172 POST error.


JMP6 Remote Maintenance Processor

   If you do NOT have a ServerGuard adapter installed, this header MUST have a jumper on the two pins on the right. Otherwise your system will NOT power up. Also look at JMP6. and also the power stuff.


J103 Remote Power-ON Request

The J103 pin header can be used to turn the system on (and off) from some external source. This can be achieved by connecting pin 2 to ground (either of the remaining pins).

PinDescription
1Ground
2-Remote Power-ON Request
3Ground

Pin 2 is directly connected to pin 29 of the nearby Op Panel connector (J43).


LogicLock

   This interesting bit of security hardware is a mechanical switch that detects if someone has attempted to open the case without using the key to unlock it. First, you need to set the administrator's password. Note: If you forget the administrator's password, you will have a planar that will not work. There has been some attempts to replace the DS1285, but that's not the complete fix. A VPD error keeps occurring. It seems the password is stored in two locations?
   Next you need to set the unauthorized access monitor to "Enabled" under Set Configuration. Note: I do not advise you to set the unauthorized access monitor to anything BUT disabled.
   I'm still trying to understand WHAT the LL will do after someone attempts to pry open your 95A system. It will definitely log the attempt. But what does it do after?


Unattended Start Mode

   Power-On password must be set first. The use of the unattended start mode (Also called "Network Server Mode") on PS/2 systems will disable the mouse port. This is normal system operation and should not be considered a defect. Disabling the mouse port is required to maintain security of the system when using unattended start mode. IBM's explanation HERE (dead).


Power On Features

   The power supply in Server 95 has a power-on/standby mode. In the standby mode, the system can be power-on by either of three methods: the power switch, a wake-up alarm from the real-time clock, or a start-up signal from serial port A (kickstart feature). The wake-up alarm and kickstart feature can be disabled by software - see Extended Control Register B (4Bh).

Wake-On-Time or Wake-up alarm: system powers on when the time and day matches the alarm bytes.

Wake-On-Ring or Kickstart: system powers on when serial port A detects incoming call or data.

The system can then be powered-off (standby mode) by the power switch or by setting the return-to-standby bit to 1 - see Extended Control Register A (4Ah).

Note: From the standby mode, the power switch must be pressed twice to turn the power off. When first pressed, the switch places the power supply in the power-on mode. Wait about 5 seconds, then press the switch again to place the system in the standby mode.


95A Audio Stage Schematic

LM386 Pinout:

Complete datasheet HERE.

Peter wrote (edited):

   Given the signal source is 5 Vpp @ 162 KΩ load, the voltage at pin 3 is currently 0.068 Vpp. At 26 dB amplification the output is 1.35 V for the normal linear amplification outside the frequency range when the bass boost is effective.

   C16 bypasses DC ripple to GND, R10/C14 act as bass boost (low pass filter) to turn up the amp gain at lower frequencies for compensating poor speaker bass response. Impedance of the Op Panel speaker is 8 Ω.

   To get a better output the R5 resistor could -probably- been bridged by e.g. a 220 KΩ resistor, which *should* result in a higher over all gain, but I don't know what's the output impedance of the audio sum node.

   It might be better to directly set the amp gain control pin 8 to pin 1 with a 10 µF / 10 KΩ RC combo. That should result in a total amp gain of about 30 (20 = 26 dB if 1 & 8 are open, 200 = 46 dB if only a 10 µF is used). Or altering the voltage divider R5 / R3 might also help.


Y2K Level 1 Compliant

   After arduous testing in the Fortress of Solitude, I have determined THE requirement for Level 1 compliance, and that is the Dallas DS1585S Serialized RTC. This chip has the required routine to accept the rollover all by itself. Other MBs that use the older Dallas DS1285 are Level 2 compliant. (all 90s, all M class 95s, possibly X class 85s).


Hacking an 8595 Case

   Yes, you CAN put a 95A planar into a 95 case. Basically, you have to extend the port opening downward until it's 9 1/16" long. The metal frame port opening must be extended downward so it's 9 1/16" long.
   First, pull the complex, adapters, power supply, drives, and planar. Then remove the rear bezel by removing the 5 hex head screws. The rear bezel will pivot upwards like the front bezel. Now you can hacksaw the frame opening downwards. I used a coping saw to cut across the bottom of the opening.
   Do the same to the rear bezel. Take a file and smooth up the cut edges (or you WILL pay for it later!). The metal frame has a very thin web left next to the opening for the power supply. It bent on me when I tried to bend up a lip for the longer EMC spring on the planar. Just say the hell with it and cut both sides of the port opening straight down.
   The real difficult part is to put the rear bezel back on. It SEEMS easy enough. You start by putting the "hinges" on the top of the pivots at the back of the case. Now try the delicate ballet of exactly lining the rear bezel up with the lips on the metal frame It took me a good 20 minutes. Note the bottom of the expansion slots has a lip that the rear bezel MUST fit onto.
   I now believe that cutting the frame while the rear bezel is still screwed on will be the easiest way. Still clean the fresh edges up with a file. Use compressed air to blow any metal fragments out.
   Put in the new planar. Match up the spring clip with the lip on the frame. Push forward and pivot the planar downward onto the lip. Make sure the screw holes match up - the planar can be too far up or down on the lip. To adjust the height, pull the planar up and to the rear. When it comes loose, move it the correct direction then reseat it.


ADF Sections for 95A Planar PE4FEh "Built In Features"

Num Lock
   Determines how the Num Lock key will be set when the operating system is started. Please note that your operating system environment might change the setting of the Num Lock key. The normal setting of this feature is <Off>.
      <"Off">, On"

Display F1 Prompt
   During startup, your system normally displays a prompt that tells you to press F1 for access to the system programs. If you wish to suppress this prompt, change the setting to <No>.
      <"Yes">, No

Hands-off Configuration
   Normally, when you add or remove adapters, devices, or memory, you provide input to reconfigure the system. If you change this setting to <Enable>, the system will attempt a hands-off configuration when hardware is added or removed. No user input will be required unless the default values cannot be used.
      <"Disable">, Enable

First Serial Port (A) (Top Serial Port)
   Serial port A can be assigned as Serial 1 through Serial 16, or disabled. Standard usage of interrupt levels is IRQ 4 for serial 1 and IRQ 3 for any other serial level.
      <"SERIAL 1, IRQ 4">, SERIAL 2, IRQ 3, SERIAL 3, IRQ 3, SERIAL 4, IRQ 3, SERIAL 5, IRQ 3, SERIAL 6, IRQ 3, SERIAL 7, IRQ 3, SERIAL 8, IRQ 3, SERIAL 9, IRQ 3, SERIAL 10, IRQ 3, SERIAL 11, IRQ 3, SERIAL 12, IRQ 3, SERIAL 13, IRQ 3, SERIAL 14, IRQ 3, SERIAL 15, IRQ 3, SERIAL 16, IRQ 3
      "SERIAL 4, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 5, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 6, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 7, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 8, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 9, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 10, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 11, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 12, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 13, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 14, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 15, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 16, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, Disabled

Second Serial Port (B) (Bottom Serial Port)
   Serial port B can be assigned as Serial 1 through 16, or disabled. Standard usage of interrupt levels is IRQ 4 for serial 1 and IRQ 3 for any other serial level.
      <SERIAL 2, IRQ 3>, SERIAL 3, IRQ 3, SERIAL 4, IRQ 3, SERIAL 5, IRQ 3, SERIAL 6, IRQ 3, SERIAL 7, IRQ 3, SERIAL 8, IRQ 3, SERIAL 9, IRQ 3, SERIAL 10, IRQ 3, SERIAL 11, IRQ 3, SERIAL 12, IRQ 3, SERIAL 13, IRQ 3, SERIAL 14, IRQ 3, SERIAL 15, IRQ 3, SERIAL 16, IRQ 3
      "SERIAL 4, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 5, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 6, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 7, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 8, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 9, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 10, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 11, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 12, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 13, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 14, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 15, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, SERIAL 16, IRQ 4, CUSTOM, Disabled, SERIAL 1, IRQ 4

High Speed Parallel Port A (Bottom Parallel Port)
      High speed parallel port A can be set as Parallel 1 - 4 or disabled.
      <"Parallel 1" io 03bc-03bf 1278-127f int7>, Parallel 2 io 0378-037f int7, Parallel 3 io 0278-027f int7, Parallel 4 io 1378-137f int7, Disabled
Ed. Parallel 2 is compatible with clone LPT 1.

Parallel Port A DMA Arbitration Level
      High speed parallel port A can be set to any one of the available DMA arbitration levels. If the level selected is shared then other devices can be set at the same level. If the level selected is dedicated then only this device can be set to that level. Select <Disabled> to use the port in compatibility mode.
      <"Shared level 7>, 6, 5, 4, 3, 1, 0 Dedicated "Level 7", 6, 5, 4, 3, 1, 0, Disabled
Ed. Windows cannot handle the serial DMA used, so for such systems, disable DMA

Parallel Port A SCB I/O Address
   High speed parallel port A can be set to any one of the available SCB I/O addresses.  Under normal circumstances this address range does not need to be changed.
      <"8100-8102">, 8900-8902, 9100-9102, 9500-9502, A100-A102, A900-A902, B100-B102, B900-B902, C100-C102, C900-C902, D100-D102, D900-D902, E100-E102, E900-E902, F100-F102, Disabled

Parallel Port B (Top Parallel Port)
   Parallel port B can be set as Parallel 1 through 4 or the port can be disabled.
      <"Parallel 2" io 0378-037d int7>, Parallel 3 io 0278-027d int7, Parallel 4 io 1378-137d int7, Disabled, 1 io 03bch-03bfh 1278h-127d int7
Note the different LPT order between LPT A and LPT B.

Parallel Port B DMA Arbitration Level
   Parallel port B can be set to any one of the available DMA arbitration levels. Shared levels can be used by other devices. If the level is dedicated then only this device can be set to that level. Select <Disabled> to use the port in compatibility mode.
      <"Shared level 6>, 5, 4, 3, 1, 0, 7 Dedicated "Level 7", 6, 5, 4, 3, 1, 0, Disabled

Unauthorized-Access Monitor
   If a privileged-access password (PAP) is set, the system monitors its covers for evidence of tampering.  If a PAP is set and this feature is set to <Enabled>, the system stops if its covers are tampered with. When the system stops, data in memory waiting to be stored might be lost. If you do not want the system to stop when its covers are tampered with, select <Disabled> in the 'Change Configuration' window.
      <"Enabled ">, Disabled
Note that when you run the Automatic Configuration program, this feature might be reset to <Enabled>.
Ed. If you forget the PAP, you can't change system configuration ever again. Very dangerous, leave DISABLED!.

ADPItem 1 Usable System-Board Memory
   Type of Usable Memory on the system board, either parity or error-correcting-code (ECC).

ADPItem 2 Bypass System Programs on Error
   When the power-on self-test (POST) detects an error, POST normally starts the system programs. If you want POST to start the operating system instead, choose <Enable>. Warning: Setting this to <Enable> could result in a partially configured system when an adapter or device is added. A partially configured system may cause some operating systems and applications to be inoperable.

ADPItem 3 Processor
   Speed and type of processor CPU used in the system.


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