AIX for PS/2 X Windows User's Guide

AIX Operating System - IBM AIX X-Windows - User's Guide

 2.0 Chapter 2.  AIX X-Windows Commands, Chapter 2, sections 2-5

2.1 CONTENTS
2.2 About This Chapter
2.3 General Information
     2.3.1 Command Defaults
     2.3.2 Geometry Specification
     2.3.3 Keyboard Specification
     2.3.4 Color Specification
     2.3.5 Display Specification
2.4 Syntax Diagrams
      2.4.1 Example of a Syntax Diagram
2.5 aixterm
      2.5.1 The COPY, PASTE, and RE-EXECUTE Functions
      2.5.2 Menu Usage
      2.5.3 Scrollbar
      2.5.4 HFT Emulation Summary
      2.5.5 VT102 Emulation Summary
      2.5.6 .Xdefaults Keywords

2.2 About This Chapter

   This chapter discusses general command information and describes the AIX  X-Windows commands in alphabetical order.  An opening section on syntax diagrams discusses how to interpret the parts of the command syntax diagrams.

   Each command description includes the following sections:

   A Purpose section that explains the command.
   A Syntax diagram that shows the required, optional, and default command syntax.
   A Description section that gives a detailed explanation of command usage.
   A Flag section that discusses each flag that can be specified with the
       command.  Where appropriate, the default setting of the flag is given.

   Explanations of file structures and command submenus are included where relevant.

   You can use the commands in this chapter to start X-Windows clients from the command line within a window.  Some commands can be selected from the window manager menu.  See "Window Manager Command Menu" in topic 2.6.3.

Note:  Not all X-Windows commands function on the S/370 system; these exceptions are noted after each command that is affected.

2.3 General Information
    The following topics are applicable to several different X-Windows commands.

2.3.1 Command Defaults

   You can customize X-Windows by copying the file /usr/lpp/X11/defaults/Xdefaults into the home directory ($HOME) as .Xdefaults and customizing the values defined in the file.  The format of each line in the file is:

     command.keyword:string

   If you omit command, the specified default value is used for all appropriate X-Windows commands.  Global defaults must appear in the file before any specific command defaults.

   Each command has keywords that correlate to the command arguments.  For more information about keywords and default values, see "Changing X-Windows Defaults" in topic 3.3 and the discussions of specific commands.

2.3.2 Geometry Specification
   Most commands accept a geometry specification, which defines the size and the placement of windows on the screen.  A geometry specification is written in the following format:

   PICTURE 8

   You specify the width and height as the number of characters for text programs, and usually as pixels for graphics programs.  The offsets Xoff and Yoff are specified as pixels.

   If you do not specify an offset, you must use a mouse to position a window.  If you specify a size and an offset, a window is automatically sized and positioned when the program begins.

   Xoff and Yoff specify distances from a corner of the screen to the nearest corner of the window in the following way:

   +-------------------------------------------+
   ¦ +Xoff+Yoff   ¦ Upper left to upper left   ¦
   +--------------+----------------------------¦
   ¦ -Xoff+Yoff   ¦ Upper right to upper right ¦
   +--------------+----------------------------¦
   ¦ +Xoff-Yoff   ¦ Lower left to lower left   ¦
   +--------------+----------------------------¦
   ¦ -Xoff-Yoff   ¦ Lower right to lower right ¦
   +-------------------------------------------+

2.3.3 Keyboard Specification

   You can change the standard keyboard layout or the default values of the keymap and function keys.  Some programs search for and use the .Xkeymap file in the home directory of the user for setting up key and function key input resolution.

   The .Xkeymap file is produced by the keycomp program  (keycomp is an abbreviation for keymap compiler).  .Xkeymap is the file used to translate keystrokes into character strings.

   Many programs perform the translation process by calling the library routine XLookupMapping.  This routine searches for the keymap table in the following order:

   1.  $XDIR/.Xkeymap (program directory)
   2.  $HOME/.Xkeymap (home directory)
   3.  /usr/lpp/X11/defaults/.Xkeymap (system directory).

   Depending on what combinations of the Shift, Lock, Ctrl, Alt, and Alt Graphic keys you use, each key can have up to 32 different interpretations or bindings. (The Alt Graphic keys are only on non-US keyboards.)  With US English keyboard mapping, for example, pressing A produces an A (an uppercase A) when Shift or Lock is down, an octal 001 when Ctrl is down, and an a (a lowercase a) when no other key is down.

   For more information on keyboard mapping, see "Keyboard Mapping" in topic 3.6.  For more information on customizing the .Xkeymap file, see "keycomp" in topic 2.7.  See the IBM AIX X-Windows Programmer's Reference for more information on the XLookupMapping routine.

2.3.4 Color Specification

   Many programs allow you to specify colors for things such as the text or the screen background.  A color specification can be given as either a color name (such as blue) or as a string of three hexadecimal values with each value specifying the intensity of the red, green, or blue color components.

   Color names are defined in the /usr/lpp/X11/rgb/rgb.txt file.  Some of the colors defined are:

                  Black            Blue
                  Cyan             Green
                  Navy             Red
                  Tan              White
                  Yellow

   The hexadecimal values must be given in one of the following formats:

      #RGB
      #RRGGBB
      #RRRGGGBBB
      #RRRRGGGGBBBB

   In this table, R, G, and B represent single hexadecimal digits (uppercase or lowercase).  When fewer than 16 bits each are specified, they represent the most significant bits of the value.  For more information, see XParseColor in the IBM AIX X-Windows Programmer's Reference.

   Note: When using one of these values as part of a sh (shell) command, enclose the value in double quotation marks.  Normally, # indicates a comment in a shell script.

2.3.5 Display Specification

   When the xinit command is first run, the $DISPLAY environment variable is set to:

     name:number

   The contents of this variable specify the display used by programs running with X-Windows:

      The name is usually the host name of a particular system.
      The number is used to specify a specific X Server on the named system.

   Some commands accept a display specification.  If the command accepts a display specification, it causes the command to run on the named system and to display on the numbered X Server on that system.

2.4 Syntax Diagrams

   Before each command discussion, a syntax diagram shows you how to enter that command correctly on the command line.  These diagrams show:

      Which flags can be entered on the command line
      Which flags must take parameters
      Which flags have optional parameters
      Default values of flags and parameters, if any
      Which flags can and cannot be entered together
      Where you must enter flags or parameters and where you have a choice
      Where you can repeat flag and parameter sequences.

   The following discussion explains how to interpret the syntax diagrams. It begins with an example diagram that shows most of the conventions used in diagrams.  Each part of the diagram is labeled and explained. Following the example are sample diagrams.

   Diagram items that must be entered literally on the command line are in bold. These items include the command name, all flags, and literal characters.  Variable items are in italics.  These items include parameters that follow flags, and parameters that the command reads, such as files and directories.  If an item has a default value, it is shown in the normal font and the path is shown in bold.  You do not enter on the command line any item shown in the normal font on a bold path.

2.4.1 Example of a Syntax Diagram

   The following diagram illustrates the conventions used in the syntax diagrams:

   PICTURE 9

   You interpret the diagram as follows:

1  COMMAND NAME
       The first item in the diagram is the name of the command you want to invoke.  It is in bold, so it must be entered exactly as it appears in the diagram. After the command name, the path branches into two paths.  You can follow either path.

2  SINGLE CHOICE BOX
  If you follow the lower path, you encounter a box with the words one of over it.  You can choose only one item from this box.

3  DEFAULT LINE
       If you follow the upper path, you bypass the single choice box, and enter nothing.  The bold line around the box is a default line, which means that you do not have to enter anything from that part of the diagram.  Exceptions are usually explained under "Description".  One important exception, the empty default line around input and output files, is explained in item 10.

4  REPEAT ARROW
       When you follow a path that takes you to a box with an arrow around it, you must choose at least one item from the box.  Then you can either follow the arrow back around and continue to choose items from the box, or you can continue along the path.  When following the arrow around just the box (rather than an arrow that includes several branches in the diagram), do not choose the same item more than once.

5  REQUIRED ITEM
      Following the branch with the repeat arrow is a branch with three choices and no default line around them.  This means that you must choose one of A, B, or C.

6  GO TO NEXT LINE
    If a diagram is too long to fit on one line, this character tells you to go to the next line of the diagram to continue entering your command line. The diagram does not end until you reach the vertical mark.

7  CONTINUE DIAGRAM
   This character shows you where to continue with the diagram after it breaks on the previous line.

8  OPTIONAL PARAMETER
    If a flag can, but does not have to, take a parameter, the path branches after the flag to show this parameter.  If you cannot enter a space between the flag and parameter, you are told in a footnote.

9  DEFAULT VALUE
      Often, a command has default values or actions that it will follow if you do not enter a specific item. If the default is not something you can enter on the command line, it is not indicated in the diagram.  However, it is discussed under "Flags".
  Note:  Default values are included in the diagram for your information.  Do not enter them on the command line.

10  INPUT OR OUTPUT
   A command that can read either standard input or input files has an empty default line around the file parameter.  If the command can write its output to either a file or to standard output, it is also shown with an empty default line around the output file parameter.  If a command can read only from standard input, input is not shown in the diagram, and standard input is assumed.  If a command writes only to standard output, this is also assumed and output is not included in the diagram.  When you must supply a file name for input or output, the file parameter is included in the diagram without a default line around it.

   Following are examples of this syntax:

     command A
     command C
     command a B
     command d B
     command e A
     command e g f A
     command C D
     command C D8
     command A E7
     command B myfile
     command a e g B D3 E6 myfile
     command d f e h C D myfile

   Note:  Although the diagram implies that the order of the flags is important, it is usually not.  When the order of the flags is important, it is indicated in the diagram, under "Flags", or in both places.  With this in mind, an additional example of how to enter this command is:

            command E9 a D g A h f myfile

2.5 aixterm
   Purpose  Initializes an X-Windows terminal emulator.

   Syntax

   PICTURE 10

   Description
   The aixterm command provides a standard terminal type for programs that do not interact directly with X-Windows.  It can emulate either an HFT terminal or a VT102 terminal.  The default is HFT emulation.  The VT102 mode is activated by the -v flag.

   aixterm supports the display of up to 16 colors at a time.

   The aixterm terminal supports escape sequences that perform terminal functions such as cursor control, moving and deleting lines, and aixterm private functions.

   Many of the special aixterm features (like the scroll bar and logging) can be modified under program control through a set of private aixterm escape sequences.  You can also use escape sequences to change the title in the title bar and to specify a new logging file name.

   For more information on these escape sequences and the supported data streams, see IBM AIX X-Windows Programmer's Reference and AIX Operating System Technical Reference.

   There are four different areas in the aixterm window:

      Title bar
      Scroll bar
      Status line
      Terminal window.

   By default, only the terminal window is initially displayed.

   The terminal window is the area provided for the terminal emulation.  When you create a window, a pseudo terminal is allocated and a command (usually a shell) is started.

   The aixterm command automatically highlights the window border, text cursor, and title bar when the mouse cursor enters the window (selected) and unhighlights them when the mouse cursor leaves the window (unselected).  If the window is the focus window, the window is highlighted regardless of the location of the mouse cursor.

   In addition to using the window manager, an aixterm window can also be hidden by clicking the window name in the title bar.  If output occurs while an aixterm window is hidden and the bitmap icon is displayed, a box is drawn around the icon title.  To monitor the aixterm window while it is hidden, the user can display a miniature version of the terminal window instead of the default icon bitmap.  This miniature window is called an active icon.

   The environment variable WINDOWID is set to the resource ID number of the aixterm window.

2.5.1 The COPY, PASTE, and RE-EXECUTE Functions

   Once you create a terminal window, aixterm allows you to save text and restore it within the same or other terminal windows by using COPY, PASTE, and RE-EXECUTE button functions.  These text functions are available in both HFT and VT102 emulation.  The selected text is highlighted while the button is pressed.

   The COPY, PASTE, and RE-EXECUTE button functions perform as described below:

COPY
            Pressing the left button saves text in the cut buffer. aixterm does a text cut, not a box cut.  Move the cursor to the beginning of the text.  Then hold the button down while moving the cursor to the end of the desired region and release the button.  The selected text is highlighted and saved in the global cut buffer when the button is released.

                       Use double-clicking to select words.
                       Use triple-clicking to select lines.

    Multiple-clicking is determined from the time that the button is released to the time the button is pressed again.

     You can also use markers to cut text.  Click the left button at the starting position of the desired region. With all the buttons up, move the mouse cursor to the end of the desired region and click the right button.  The desired region will be highlighted and saved in the cut buffer.

     The right button also extends the current selection. Once a desired region has been selected, pressing the right button again will add the region between the current mouse position and the previously selected region to the cut buffer.  The extension will be in the same selection mode that the previous selection or extension was performed.  Use multiple-clicking to cycle through the various selection modes.

PASTE 
          Pressing both buttons at once (or the middle button on a three-button mouse) types the text from the cut buffer into the terminal window that contains the mouse cursor, inserting it as keyboard input.

RE-EXECUTE
      Pressing Shift and the left mouse button takes the text from the cursor (at button release) through the end of line (including the new line), saves it in the global cut buffer and immediately retypes the line, inserting it as keyboard input.  The selected text is highlighted. Moving the mouse cursor off of the initial line cancels the selection.  If there is no text beyond the initial cursor point, aixterm sounds the bell, indicating an error.

   By cutting and pasting pieces of text without trailing new lines, you can take text from several places in different terminal windows and form a command to the shell, for example, or take output from a program and insert it into your favorite editor running in a terminal window.  The cut buffer is globally shared among different terminal windows.  The terminal emulator treats the cut buffer like a text file, in that the text is delimited by new lines.

2.5.2 Menu Usage

   The aixterm command has three different menus:
      Options
      Modes
      Scrollbar.

   Each menu pops up under the correct combinations of key and button presses.  Each menu contains various modes that can be toggled.  Most of the menu items can also be altered by the use of command options.  A + (plus sign) appears next to a mode that is currently active.  Selecting one of these modes toggles its state.  Some items of the menus are command entries; selecting one of these performs the indicated function.

   The Options menu pops up when Ctrl and the left mouse button are pressed in a window.  The menu contains items that apply to all emulation modes. This menu can also be activated by pressing the left mouse button while the mouse cursor is in the title bar.

   The Modes menu sets various modes for each emulation mode.  The menu is activated by pressing simultaneously the Ctrl key and the right mouse button while the mouse cursor is in the window.  The soft reset entry resets scroll regions, a function that can be useful when a program leaves the scroll regions set incorrectly.  The full reset entry clears the screen, resets tabs to every eight columns, and resets the terminal modes (such as wrap and smooth scroll) to their states after aixterm finishes processing the command line options.  This menu can also be activated by pressing the right mouse button while the mouse cursor is in the title bar.

   The Scrollbar menu pops up when both mouse buttons are pressed at once (or the middle button is pressed on a three-button mouse) while the mouse cursor is on the scroll bar.  This menu allows several modes particular to the scroll bar to be set.

2.5.3 Scrollbar

   The aixterm command supports an optional scroll bar composed of a scroll button displayed at the top of the scroll bar and a scroll region at the bottom.  The scroll bar is hidden until its display is requested. Pressing both buttons on the mouse at once (or the middle button on a three-button mouse) while the cursor is in any part of the scroll bar displays the scroll bar menu.

   The scroll region displays the position and amount of text currently showing in the window (highlighted) relative to the amount of text actually saved in the scrolling buffer.  As more text is saved in the scrolling buffer, the size of the highlighted area decreases.  Clicking either the left or right button while the mouse cursor is in the scroll region positions the top of the display window at the mouse cursor.

   The scroll button causes the window to scroll up and down within the saved text.  Clicking the left button moves the window position up (the text scrolls downward), while clicking the right button moves the window position down (the text scrolls upward).  The amount of scrolling is modified by the Shift and Ctrl keys.  If neither key is pressed, the window scrolls a single line at a time.  Pressing the Shift key causes the text to scroll a full window at a time, minus one line.  Pressing the Ctrl key causes the text to be positioned at the extreme top or bottom of the file.

2.5.4 HFT Emulation Summary
       The aixterm command supports a window that is equivalent to an HFT virtual terminal.

   HFT emulation functions summary

   A subset of HFT ioctl/VTDs is supported.  For more information, see
    IBM AIX X-Windows Programmer's Reference.
   Keyboard mapping is defined by XLookupMapping and the keycomp command.
    For more information, see "keycomp" in topic 2.7.  For more
    information about XLookupMapping refer to IBM AIX X-Windows
    Programmer's Reference.  For information on keyboard mapping, see
    Keyboard Description and Character Reference.
   International Character Support is provided for code page switching
    single-shift control characters.  For more information on the
    datastream, see AIX Operating System Technical Reference.
   The HFT datastream, as defined in AIX OS Technical Reference, is
    supported.
   Mouse reports are supported.
   HFT escape sequences beyond the standard VT102 set are implemented.
    For more information, see IBM AIX X-Windows Programmer's Reference.

2.5.5 VT102 Emulation Summary

   The aixterm command emulates a VT102 terminal when the -v command option is specified.  When VT102 emulation is requested, aixterm sets the TERM environment variable to vt100.

   Five keyboard states are handled by XLookupMapping.  In order to have VT102 keyboard mapping, a VT102 .Xkeymap file must reside in the home directory of the user or in a directory supported by XLookupMapping.

   The VT102 emulation does not support a blinking character attribute nor double-wide and double-size character sets.  Also, International Character Support is not provided during VT102 emulation.

Flags
An option takes on the opposite value if the - (minus sign) is changed to a + (plus sign).  These options override those set in the .Xdefaults file.

The aixterm command uses the following flags:

-ah                Always highlight the text cursor.

-ar
   Turns on the auto-raise mode of aixterm, which automatically raises the window (after a delay determined by keyword autoRaiseDelay) when the mouse cursor enters the window.  The default is off.
    This flag can be turned on and off from the Options menu.

-b num
   Specifies the width in pixels of an inner border. The inner border is the distance between the outer edge of the characters and the window border.  The default is 2.

-bd color
   Specifies the color of the highlighted border on color displays.  The default is black.

-bg color
   Specifies the color of the window background on color displays.  The default is white.

-bi
   Defines the icon window to be a miniature terminal window (active icon) instead of an icon bitmap. The default is an icon bitmap.
   This option can be turned on and off from the Options menu.

-bw num
   Specifies the width of the window border in pixels.  The default is 2 pixels.

-cr color
   Determines the color of the text cursor on color displays.  The default is the foreground color.

-cu
   Causes certain curses applications to display leading tabs correctly.  The default is off.
   This option can be turned on and off from the Modes menu.

-display name:number
   Identifies the host name and X Server display number where aixterm is to run.  By default, aixterm gets the host name and display number from the environment variable DISPLAY.  For more information, see "Display Specification" in topic 2.3.5.

-dw
   Causes the mouse cursor to move (warp) automatically to the center of the aixterm window when the aixterm icon window is deiconified.  The default is off.

-e cmd
   Specifies a command to be executed in the window. This flag executes the command; it does not start a shell.  If this flag is used, the command and its arguments (if any) must appear last on the aixterm command line.  When the specified command has completed, aixterm will exit and its window will disappear.

-fb font
   Specifies the name of the bold font.  This font must be the same height and width as the normal font.

-fg color
   Determines the foreground color of the text on color displays.  The default is black.

-fi font
   Specifies the font to be used for the active icon window.  The default is Rom6.500 for HFT mode.  In VT102 emulation, the default is nil2.

-fn font
   Specifies the name of a normal font.  Any fixed-width font can be used.  In HFT emulation, the default is Rom14.500 for a large display, Rom10.500 for a medium display, Rom8.500 for a small display.  In VT102 emulation, the default is vtsingle.

-ft font
   Specifies the name of a title bar font.  The default is the normal font.

-fullcursor             Specifies the full-height text cursor.

-geometry geometry
   Specifies the location and the dimensions of a window.  The default is 80x25+0+0. For more information on geometry, see "Geometry Specification" in topic 2.3.2.

# geometry
   Specifies the location of an icon window.  If specified, width and height are ignored.  Width and height are taken from the size of the bitmap and the length of the title.
 Note:  When using one of these values as part of a sh (shell) command, enclose the value in double quotation marks.  Normally, # indicates a comment in a shell script.
 For more information on geometry specifications, see "Geometry Specification" in topic 2.3.2.

-i
   Causes aixterm to display the icon window rather than the normal window when the window is opened. The default is off.

-ib file
    Specifies the bitmap file to read for use as the icon bitmap file instead of the default bitmap file.  See /usr/include/X11/bitmaps for a sample bitmap file.

-j
   Causes aixterm to move multiple lines up at once (jump scroll) if many lines are queued for display.  The default is off.
 This option can be turned on and off from the Modes menu.

-keywords
   Specifies the keywords used by aixterm in the .Xdefaults file.

-l
   Causes aixterm to append output from the window to the end of the logfile file.  The default is off. 
   This option can be turned on and off from the Options menu.
  This does not override LogInhibit in the .Xdefaults file.  For more information about LogInhibit, see page 2.5.6.

-leftscroll
   Places scrollbar on the left side of the textwindow (-sb scrollbar must be turned on first).

-lf file
   Specifies the file where the output is saved, instead of the default file XtermLog.xxxxx, where xxxxx is the process ID of aixterm.  The file is created in the directory where aixterm is started, or in the home directory for a login aixterm.  If the file name begins with a | (pipe symbol), the rest of the string is interpreted as a command to be executed by the shell and a pipe is opened to the process.

-ls
   Causes the shell run under aixterm to be a login shell.  The user's .login or .profile file is read, and the initial directory is usually the home directory.  The default is off.  Note: -If only works if -I is turned on.

-mb
   Turns on the right margin bell.  The default is off.
   This option can be turned on and off from the Modes menu.

-ms color
   Determines the color of the mouse cursor on color displays.  The default is the foreground color.

-n name
   Specifies a window name for use by aixterm.  This name is displayed in the title bar.

-name name
   Specifies the .Xdefaults application name that is to be used when looking up keywords (instead of the aixterm default).

-nb num
   Specifies the right margin distance at which the margin bell rings.  The default is 10 spaces from the right edge of the window.

-po num
   Specifies the number of lines from the previous screen that will still be displayed on the screen when the window is scrolled one page.  The default is 1 line.

-ps
   Turns on the page scroll mode. After a page of lines is displayed, aixterm stops displaying new lines and the text cursor disappears.  Pressing the Enter key displays one new line.  Pressing the space bar or a character key displays a new page.

-r
   Reverses the foreground and background colors. This becomes the normal video mode.
 This option can be turned on and off from the Modes menu.

-rw
   Turns on reverse-wraparound mode.  The default is off.
 This mode allows the cursor to wraparound from the leftmost column to the rightmost column of the previous line.  This can be useful in the shell to allow erasing characters backwards across the previous line.
 This option can be turned on and off from the Modes menu.

-s
   Turns off synchronous scrolling on the display. The default is on. When this flag is specified, aixterm no longer attempts to keep the screen current while scrolling and can run faster when network latencies are very high.

-sb
   Causes the scrollbar to be displayed. This option may be turned on and off from the Modes menu.  The default is off.

-si
   While using the scrollbar to review previous lines of text, the window is normally repositioned automatically at the bottom of the scroll region before output to the screen is processed.  The default is on.
 This option disables window repositioning on output.

-sk
   Causes the window to be repositioned automatically in the normal position at the bottom of the scroll region when a key is pressed.  The default is off. This option is intended for use with the scroll bar to review previous lines of text. Pressing a key also creates output, which will be affected by the -si option.
 This option can be turned on and off from the Scrollbar menu.

-sl num
   Specifies the maximum number of lines to save that are scrolled off of the top of the window.  The default is 64.

-sn
   Displays the status line to be displayed in normal video (the status line is still enclosed in a box).  By default, the status line appears in reverse-video relative to the rest of the window. This option can be turned on and off from the Modes menu.

-st
   isplays the status line on startup.  The default is off.

-tb
   Disables the display of the title bar on startup. This option can be turned on and off from the Options menu.

-ti
   Displays the title to the right of the bitmap in the icon window.  By default, the title appears under the bitmap.

-tn name
   Specifies the TERM environment variable (of the shell running in the aixterm window to name).

-ut   Disables the /etc/utmp file entry.

-v
   Enables VT102 emulation.  By default, an HFT terminal is emulated. Note:  Keyboard map is needed for this mode.

-vb
   Enables the visual bell mode.  The visual bell flashes the window on receipt of the Ctrl-G key combination instead of ringing the bell.  The default is off.

-W
   Causes the mouse cursor to move (warp) to the middle of the aixterm window when the window is created.  The default is off.

-132
   Causes the sm/rm escape sequences to be recognized and the aixterm window to be resized as specified. Normally, the sm/rm escape sequences that switch between the 80-column and 132-column modes are ignored.  The default is off.
 This option can be turned on and off from the Modes menu.
 For more information, see IBM AIX X-Windows Programmer's Reference.

2.5.6 .Xdefaults Keywords

   The following default keywords are used with the aixterm command.  (An example default file is in /usr/lpp/X11/defaults.)

activeIcon
  If true, displays the aixterm icon window as a miniature terminal window (active icon) instead of an icon bitmap.  The default is false.

allowIconInput
   If true, allows keyboard input to the miniature terminal window (active icon).  The default is false.

autoRaise
   If true, raises the aixterm window automatically (after a delay of autoRaiseDelay) when the mouse cursor enters the window.  The default is false.

autoRaiseDelay
   If autoRaise is true, specifies the number of seconds to delay before automatically raising a window.  The default is 2 seconds.

background
   Specifies the color of the window background on color displays. The default is a white background.

boldFont
 Specifies a bold font.  This font must have the same height and width as the normal body font.

borderColor
   Specifies the color of the window border.

borderWidth
    Specifies the width of the window border in pixels.  The default is 2 pixels.

c132
   If true, specifies that the sm/rm escape sequences to resize the aixterm window between 80 and 132 columns be recognized.  The default is false.

curses
   If true, causes certain curses applications to display leading tabs correctly.  The default is false.

cursorColor
   Specifies the color of the text cursor on color displays.  The default is the foreground color.

deiconifyWarp
   If true, moves or warps the mouse to the center of the window when replacing the aixterm icon window with the aixterm window. The default is false.

font
   Specifies the name of the normal text font used in the body of the aixterm window.

foreground
   Specifies the color for the text displayed inside the body of the window on color displays.  The default is black.

geometry
   Specifies the location or dimensions of the window.  For more information about geometry, see "Geometry Specification" in topic 2.3.2.

iconBitmap
   Reads the bitmap filename and uses the resulting bitmap as the icon.

iconFont
   Specifies the name of the text font used in miniature active icon windows.

iconGeometry
   Specifies the location of the icon window.  For more information about geometry, see "Geometry Specification" in topic 2.3.2.

iconStartup
   If true, it causes aixterm to start by displaying an icon window rather than the normal window.

internalBorder
   Specifies the number of pixels between the text characters and the window border.  The default is 2 pixels.

jumpScroll
   If true, it enables jump scroll.  The default is false.

logFile
   If logging is true, it specifies the file in which the log is written.  The default is XtermLog.XXXXX, where XXXXX is a unique ID of aixterm.

logging
   If true, appends all input from the pseudo tty to the logfile. The default is false.

logInhibit
   If true, it prevents a user or an application program from enabling logging.  This overrides any values set for Logging.

marginBell
   If true, it enables the right margin bell.  The default is false.

nMarginBell
   Specifies the distance from the right edge of the window where the margin bell rings.  The default is 10 spaces from the right edge of the window.

pageOverlap
   Specifies the number of lines from the previous screen that will remain on the screen when the terminal is scrolled one page.  In page scroll mode, a page is the number of lines in the the scrolling region minus the page overlap.  The default is 1 line.

pageScroll
   If true, it enables the page scroll mode.  The default is false. After a page of lines is displayed, aixterm stops displaying new lines and the text cursor disappears.  Pressing the Enter key displays one new line.  Pressing the space bar or a character key displays a new page.

pointerColor
   Specifies the color of the mouse cursor on color displays.  The default is the color of the text cursor.

pointerShape
   Specifies the shape of the mouse cursor to be used in an aixterm window.  See the IBM AIX X-Windows Programmer's Reference for a list of cursors.  The default is XC_left_ptr.

reverseVideo
   If true, it reverses the foreground and background color.  The default is false.

reverseWrap
   If true, it sets reverse-wraparound mode, which allows the cursor to wrap from the leftmost column to the rightmost column of the previous line.  The default is false.

saveLines
   When lines are scrolled off the top of a window, they can be saved.  This number specifies the maximum number of lines to save.  The default is 64 lines.

scrollBar
   If true, it displays the scroll bar during startup.

scrollInput
   Specifies whether or not output to the terminal should automatically cause the scrollbar to go to the bottom of the scrolling region.  The default is true.

scrollKey
   If true, it automatically repositions the window in the normal position, at the bottom of the scroll region, when a key is pressed while using the scroll bar to review previous lines of text.  The default is false.
   Pressing a key also creates input, affected by keyword scrollInput.

statusLine
   If true, it displays the status line on startup.  The default is false.

statusNormal
   If true, it displays the status line in normal video (the status line is still enclosed in a box).  By default, the status line is in reverse-video relative to the rest of the window.

termName
   Specifies the value of the TERM environment variable (of the shell running in the aixterm window).

textUnderIcon
   If false, it displays the title of the icon window at the right of the bitmap in the icon window.  By default, the title is displayed under the bitmap.

title
   Specifies the title to be shown in the titlebar.  The default is aixterm.

titleBar
   If false, it disables the title bar from being displayed on startup.  The default is true.

titleFont
   Specifies the name of the font to be used in the title bar.  The default is the normal body font.

visualBell
   If true, it enables the visual bell mode which flashes the window on receipt of a CTRL-G.  The default is false.

vt102
   If true, it enables VT102 mode.  The default is HFT emulation.

warp
   If true, it automatically warps (moves) the mouse cursor to the center of a newly created aixterm window.  The default is false.

   For more information on these keywords, see "Changing X-Windows Defaults" in topic 3.3.

Content created and/or collected by:
Louis Ohland, Peter Wendt, William Walsh, David Beem, Tatsuo Sunagawa, Jim Shorney, Tim Clarke, Kevin Bowling, Tomáš Slavotínek, and many others.

Ardent Tool of Capitalism - MAD Edition! is maintained by Tomáš Slavotínek.
Last update: 06 Oct 2021 - Changes & Credits | Legal Info & Contact