PS/2 8580 Bus Memory Adapters

There are  many available 386 memory adapters available for both the 8580 and the 8570. They generally exist in two groups; those with more than 16 MB capacity and those with 16 MB or less capacity.

I have initially listed only adapters which I have had personal experience with. I will expand this list with others over time.

Adapters with more than 16 MB capacity
ADF Code Description Max Capacity SIMM Type Max Qty
@71D0 Kingston KTM-MC64/x 64 MB 72-pin 4
@7EC0 AccuLogic SIMMply RAM/32 64 MB 72-pin 4
@70D1 Intel Above Board MC 32 MB 30-pin 8

Adapters with 16 MB or less capacity
ADF Code Description Max Capacity SIMM Type Max Qty
@7D7F Orchid RAM Request Extra 16/32 8 MB 30-pin 8
@70D0 Kingston KTM 16000/386 Memory Exp.
(KTM-3011-x, KTM-3077-x, Magic Ram)
16 MB 72-pin 4
@FAFF IBM 2-6MB (386) Memory Expansion Option 6 MB non-SIMM 3
@FCFF IBM 2-8MB (386) Memory Expansion Adapter 8 MB 72-pin 4
@FCFF Cumulus CuRAM 605 Memory Adapter 8 MB 72-pin 4
@FDDE IBM PS/2 Enhanced 80386 Mem Exp w/ROM 16 MB 72-pin 4
@FDDF IBM PS/2 Enhanced 80386 Memory Exp. 16 MB 72-pin 4

Installing Memory to reach above 16 MB to maximum of 64 MB

There has been a lot of controversy regarding the requirements to exceed the 16 MB boundary within a Model 80. I intend to do some research into this and make my findings available to you at a later date. I have personally boosted the memory on one of my 8580 systems to 60MB using two of the Kingston KTM-MC/x memory adapters. Two were required as I have never been able to locate the Kingston 16 MB SIMMs that this memory adapter will accept.

Peter Wendt made a rather detailed dissertation on this topic which I have included here for your perusal:

Hi !

> > > The trick is you must have an adapter in there somewhere with
> > > a BIOS or a CPU on it, I've forgot which.  The IBM memory or
> > > the SCSI adapters have these.

This part is definitely misleading or misunderstood.
- even busmaster adapters with 32-bit addressing width cannot substitute
the missing DMA functions for the memory above 16MB
- the ROM they supply is for their own function.

The BOPT-workaround works even with no other adapter installed in the
system than the two memory cards. (BOPT = Bypasses One Problem
Temporarily)

Also the use of Kingston or Acculogic cards pushes the system over the
16MB-limit.

The problem is the 24-bit DMA-chip on Mod. 70 and 80 - since 2^24 =
16.0MB addressing range. This is the range where DMA can be used to
transfer data among the memory - if the DMA cannot be used direct
addressing (PIO) must be used to transfer data to the locations above the
DMA-addressing range. Works as well but is a little slower.

A problem on the older models might occur with detection of memory
errors. The parity-informations are mainly transported with DMA to
detect and handle bit-failures.
(Mainly cause an NMI error though - and the system stops with 111 ??????
or such)

If the DMA cannot directly access the memory a parity error *might* be
undetected.
The memory handler invoked with the BOPT-workaround uses the PIO-mode
for the error-detection ... the Kingston and Acculogic cards have own
parity control integrated in their chipsets.

This however has nothing to do with the memory *refresh*, which is
directly controlled by the memory subsystem on the planar and on the
memory cards.

Let's say the system has 8MB on the planar and 16MB on a Kingston card.
The planar-8MB are under full control of the boards DMA and parity
logic.
The 16MB on the Kingston card are on the control of the cards' parity
control and the lower 8MB can be accessed directly by the
systemboard-DMA - the upper 8MB are used via normal 32-bit direct
addressing bytewise.

The fastest memory access is that for the planar memory: DMA plus 0 - 1
waitstate make it rather quick.
The slowest memory access is that on the range from 16MB - 24MB:
bytewise direct-accessing to read from memory and to write to memory
plus 1 - 3 wait-states on "channel memory" take some time.

Pushing a Mod. 70 / 80 over the 16MB border makes only sense with a real
32-bit operating system, which can handle the different memory addressing
models with no problems (like OS/2) - DOS / Windows may have some
problems. I ran a Mod. 80-A31 under OS/2 Warp Server with 40MB for quite
some time without any problem.
It had 8MB on the planar (2 x 4MB), 32MB on an Acculogic card (4 x 8MB),
an IBM SCSI controller without Cache /A, an Adaptec AHA-1640 (for tape
and CD), an IBM Token Ring 16/4 Adapter /A and an AMS 2-LPT card.
 

Very friendly greetings from Peter in Germany
 - Please respond to : peterwendt@aol.com -
http://members.aol.com/mcapage0/mcaindex.htm

Additional details regarding the IBM PS/2 Enhanced 80386 Memory Expansion Adapter/A are available at IBM Enhanced 80386 Memory Expansion Adapter/A

Matrix of Adapters and Acceptable SIMMs

IBM PS/2:

8 MB 8 MB 4 MB 4 MB 2 MB 2 MB 2 MB 1 MB 1 MB
ADF # 80 ns 70 ns 80 ns 70 ns 100 ns 85 ns 80 ns 100 ns 85 ns
@70D0








@70D1








@71D0


OK




@7EC0








@FAFF








@FCFF








@FDDE








@FDDF








Kingston:

8 MB 8 MB 4 MB 4 MB 2 MB 2 MB 2 MB 1 MB 1 MB
ADF # 80 ns 70 ns 80 ns 70 ns 100 ns 85 ns 80 ns 100 ns 85 ns
@70D0








@70D1








@71D0 OK NO OK





@7EC0








@FAFF








@FCFF








@FDDE








@FDDF









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