TR Troubleshooting - Repeater Problems 

Is the failure symptom that no data traffic can get from one side of the repeater to the other, or that a hard error such as a beaconing condition is present on the ring? 
Go to page 9.1. 

This procedure is generic as to the repeater manufacturer. For some of the troubleshooting steps mentioned on this page, you should also reference the repeater manufacturer's documentation for any special predefined methods for checking repeater configuration and for repeater testing. 



9.1 No data traffic can get from one side of the repeater to the other, or a hard error such as a beaconing condition is present on the ring.

If a repeater is the suspected problem, first attempt to troubleshoot the problem by testing the main ring path cabling section that normally passes through the repeater. Do this by disconnecting the attached cable sections and relooping the cabling sections at the repeater entry points with patch cables. With fiber optic cabling, this may be more difficult. Bypass the repeater and test the main ring path cabling segments with a Time Domain Reflectometer (or Optical TDR in the case of fiber).

With the repeater disconnected, did testing the cable produce any cable faults?

Most likely a problem exists with the main ring path cabling. If you a re not sure what portion of the main ring path section is bad, go to page 3.

If you are sure as to which portion of the main ring cabling path section is bad, replace that section. Then reattach the repeater and retest the ring. If the failure symptom is gone, record the problem in the network maintenance and service log. If the problem still exists after retesting, go to the next step.

Attempt to run any available repeater diagnostics.

Did running the diagnostics produce any errors that identify a repeater failure?

Take the necessary action to resolve the problem and retest the repeater for proper operation. If the failure symptom is gone, record the problem in the network maintenance and service log. If the problem still exists after retesting, go to the next step .

Thoroughly check the repeater configuration.

Are any incorrect configuration parameters present in the repeater?

Take the necessary action to resolve the problem and retest the repeater for proper operation. If the failure symptom is gone, record the problem in the network maintenance and service log. If the problem still exists after retesting, go to the next step .

Check the actual physical placement of the repeater with respect to its specification for distance requirements within the Token Ring cabling system.
Sometimes the physical placement of a repeater can cause failure symptoms that point to the main ring path cabling being at fault. Consult the repeater manufacturer for instructions as to distance requirements.

Is the repeater incorrectly placed as to its specifications?

Take the necessary action to resolve the problem and retest the repeater for proper operation. If the failure symptom is gone, record the problem in the network maintenance and service log. If the problem still exists after retesting, go to the next step .

A problem may still exist with the repeater, but to get more conclusive fault-isolation data, go to page 15.

If after using this procedure you cannot conclusively locate the problem and continue to find failure symptoms that point to a repeater problem, reference the manufacturer's instructions. 

 November 15, 1996 

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