MCA - Basic Transfer Procedure

Basic Transfer Procedure
   Default Cycle (≥200 ns)
   Synchronous Extended Cycle (≥300 ns)
   Asynchronous Extended Cycle (≥300 ns)


Basic Transfer Procedure

All masters and DMA controllers transfer data with the same control sequence. The following covers the case of a write cycle. The signals appear in the following sequence:

  1. The master drives the address bus, MADE 24, M/-IO, -APAREN, APAR(0-3) and -REFRESH (if applicable) valid, beginning the cycle.

  2. In response to an unlatched decode of address, MADE 24, and M/-IO, the selected slave returns:

    • -CD SFDBK
    • -CD DS 16 (if the addressed data port is capable of 16-bit operations)
    • -CD DS 16 and -CD DS 32 (if addressed data port is capable of 32-bit operations)

  3. The master drives status signal -S0 active (-S1 inactive.)

  4. In response to an unlatched decode of address, MADE 24, M/-IO, and status, the selected slave drives CD CHRDY inactive if the cycle is to be extended.

  5. The master drives -ADL active. A slave can latch decodes of address, status, and M/-IO at the leading or trailing edge of -ADL. A DMA slave can also be selected by a latched decode of the same signals, using the arbitration level in place of the address.

  6. The master drives the write data onto the data bus and, if appropriate, drives -DPAREN active and DPAR(0-3) valid.

  7. The master drives -CMD active and -ADL inactive. A slave must latch the decodes of address, status, and M/-IO with the leading edge of -CMD if they weren't latched with -ADL.

  8. If CD CHRDY has been driven inactive, the cycle is extended until CD CHRDY is driven active. The signal must not be held inactive longer than specified.

  9. The status signals become inactive and the address bus can change in preparation for the next cycle.

  10. In response to an address change, the slave updates the state of:

    • -CD SFDBK
    • -CD DS 16
    • -CD DS 32.

  11. The status signals and M/-IO can become valid in preparation for the next cycle.

  12. -CMD goes inactive and the selected slave receives the data from the data bus.

The data transfer cycle is complete.

Note: The changes to the address bus and status (-S0, -S1) can be overlapped with the preceding cycle to minimize the impact of the memory access time.

The sequence for the basic transfer procedure is as follows.


Figure 1-22. Basic Transfer Procedure - Overview

Whether a default, a synchronous-extended, or an asynchronous-extended cycle is performed depends on how a slave uses CD CHRDY.

  • A default cycle occurs when a slave does not drive CD CHRDY inactive.

  • A synchronous-extended cycle occurs when a slave drives CD CHRDY inactive, then releases CD CHRDY synchronously within the specified time after the leading edge of -CMD. The slave provides the read data within the specified time from -CMD active.

  • An asynchronous-extended cycle occurs when a slave drives the CD CHRDY inactive, then releases CD CHRDY asynchronously.

If a master begins a transfer cycle but must abort that cycle, -ADL and -CMD must not be activated, and -S0, -S1 must be activated with a minimum pulse width T2A (see Figure 1-24 on page 1-34 for the T2A timing specification). -BURST, if active, is deactivated with status deactivation. Slaves must not latch CD CHRDY inactive until after the appearance of an active -ADL signal, and if the cycle is aborted, must release CD CHRDY with the deactivation of status. The selected slave degates the data bus and data transfer control signals when it is no longer selected (status and -CMD are inactive).

Default Cycle Timing (200 ns Minimum)

This section provides the specifications for the timing parameters for the I/O and memory default transfer cycle.


Figure 1-23. Default Cycle (200 ns Minimum)


Figure 1-24. Default Cycle (200 ns Minimum) Timing Specifications

Notes:

  1. Slaves drive -CD SFDBK when selected by either arbitration or address. The slave does not drive -CD SFDBK active when selected by -CD SETUP.

  2. The master must hold the address bus and associated signals valid until -DS 16 RTN, -DS 32 RTN, and -SFDBKRTN are sampled, in addition to meeting T5 and T9. The slave must continue to drive -CD DS 16/32 and -CD SFDBK as long as its address is valid.

  3. A master can deactivate status and address concurrently. This can result in changes on the address bus while status is still active at the slave. CD CHRDY can change states during changes on the address bus.

  4. It is recommended that slaves use transparent latches to latch information with the leading edge of -CMD, or with the leading or trailing edge of -ADL.

  5. When data parity is supported, the implemented data parity signals must be active and stable on the bus for the data to be considered valid.

  6. -CD DS 16/32 and -CD SFDBK must be driven by unlatched address decodes because the next address can be driven valid in the current cycle

  7. When address parity is supported, the implemented address parity signals must be active and stable for the address to be considered valid.

  8. Tl9 is a valid timing parameter only when T2 is less than 65 nanoseconds.

  9. The centralized steering delay applies when a 16-bit master accesses a 32-bit data port. The slave must compensate for the centralized steering delay, as required.

  10. Masters must provide this minimum timing for the central arbitration control point and for inactive state exit. Other participants must not depend on this minimum during an abort cycle. (See "Central Arbitration Control Point" on page 1-21 for more information.)

  11. A bus master must deactivate -S(0,1) as soon as possible after the hold time specified by T7 and T10, and prior to the deactivation of -CMD. Additional rules apply for extended cycles and streaming data cycles.

  12. If data parity is used, see T96 timing in Figure 1-71 on page 1-86.

  13. TR 32 can be held inactive between cycles by a 32-bit master. TR 32 timings are provided to define when it must be valid on the first and last cycle.

Synchronous-Extended Cycle Timing (300 ns Minimum)

A synchronous-extended cycle occurs when a slave drives CD CHRDY inactive, then releases CD CHRDY synchronously within the specified time after the leading edge of -CMD.

The timing sequence is shown in the following figure


Figure 1-25. Synchronous-Extended Cycle (300 ns Minimum)


Figure 1-26. Synchronous-Extended Cycle Timing Specifications (300 ns Minimum)

Notes:

  1. CD CHRDY is released by a slave performing a 300 nanoseconds extended cycle within the specified time after the leading edge of -CMD.

  2. A master can deactivate status and address concurrently. This can result in changes on the address bus while status is still active at the slave. CD CHRDY can change states during changes on the address bus.

  3. T27 and T27R apply only when Tl is greater than 30 nanoseconds. T26 and T26R applies only when Tl is less than or equal to 30 nanoseconds.

  4. Masters are responsible for controlling their own bus activity. When a master uses overlapped cycles, it must be capable of handling (or ignoring) CD CHRDY from the next slave while terminating the cycle with the current slave. Once the current cycle is terminated, the master must act appropriately to an inactive CD CHRDY signal. Masters must also recognize and handle any added delay in a slaves deactivation of CD CHRDY caused by overlapped cycles.

  5. A bus master must deactivate -S0, -S1 as specified in the default cycle, and this deactivation must be independent of CHRDYRTN. Slaves should not depend on the removal of -S0,-S1 for the deactivation of CD CHRDY.

  6. When address parity is supported, the address parity signals (APAR 0-3) must be active and stable for the address to be considered valid.

Asynchronous-Extended Cycle Timing (300 ns Minimum)

An asynchronous-extended cycle occurs when a slave drives CD CHRDY inactive, then releases CD CHRDY asynchronously.


Figure 1-27. Asynchronous Extended Cycle (300 ns Minimum)


Figure 1-28. Asynchronous-Extended Cycle Timing Specifications (300 ns Minimum)

Notes:

  1. CD CHRDY is released asynchronously by a slave performing a ≥300-ns cycle. The slave must present the read data within the time specified after the release of CD CHRDY.

  2. A master can deactivate status and address concurrently. This can result in changes on the address bus while status is still active at the slave. CD CHRDY can change states during changes on the address bus.

  3. T27 and T27R apply only when T1 is greater than 30 nanoseconds. T26 and T26R apply only when T1 is less than or equal to 30 nanoseconds.

  4. Masters are responsible for controlling their own bus activity. When a master uses overlapped cycles, it must be capable of handling (or ignoring) CD CHRDY from the next slave while terminating the cycle with the current slave. Once the current cycle is terminated, the master must act appropriately to an inactive CD CHRDY signal. Masters must also recognize and handle the potential added delay in a slave's deactivation of CD CHRDY due to overlapped cycles.

  5. A bus master must deactivate -S0, -S1 as specified in the default cycle, and this deactivation must be independent of CHRDYRTN. Slaves should not have dependencies on removal of -S0, -S1 for the deactivation of CD CHRDY.

  6. When address parity is supported, the implemented address parity signals (APAR 0-3) must be active and stable for the address to be considered valid.

Content created and/or collected by:
Louis Ohland, Peter Wendt, William Walsh, David Beem, Tatsuo Sunagawa, Jim Shorney, Tim Clarke, Kevin Bowling, Tomáš Slavotínek, and many others.

Ardent Tool of Capitalism - MAD Edition! is maintained by Tomáš Slavotínek.
Last update: 19 Nov 2021 - Changes & Credits | Legal Info & Contact