Micro Channel Pinouts

Pinouts:
   8-bit Section
   16-bit Section
   32-bit Section
   Matched-Memory Extension (MME)
   Auxiliary Video Extension (AVE)
   Base Video Extension (BVE)

Signal Descriptions:
   Micro Channel Buses and Signals
   Arbitration Bus and Associated Signals
   Address Bus and Associated Signals
   Data Bus and Associated Signals
   Interrupt Signals
   Other Micro Channel Signals
   Channel Signal Groups (Digital)
   Matched-Memory Extension Signal Descriptions
   Auxiliary Video Extension Signal Descriptions
   Micro Channel Architecture Base and Extensions

All drawings made by Tomas Slavotinek.


Notes

The "component side" (A) and "solder side" (B) refers to an installed adapter card.

The "Rear" arrow points towards the back side of the planar/system unit.

The physical key between pins 45 and 48 serves as a reference point for all connector types.


8-bit Section

Side B (solder)Pin #Side A (component)
AUDIO GND01-CD SETUP
AUDIO02MADE 24
GND03GND
14.3 MHz OSC04A 11
GND05A 10
A 2306A 09
A 2207+5 Vdc
A 2108A 08
GND09A 07
A 2010A 06
A 1911+5 Vdc
A 1812A 05
GND13A 04
A 1714A 03
A 1615+5 Vdc
A 1516A 02
GND17A 01
A 1418A 00
A 1319+12 Vdc
A 1220-ADL
GND21-PREEMPT
-IRQ 0922-BURST
-IRQ 0323-12 Vdc
-IRQ 0424ARB 00
GND25ARB 01
-IRQ 0526ARB 02
-IRQ 0627-12 Vdc
-IRQ 0728ARB 03
GND29ARB/-GNT
-DPAREN 1)30-TC
DPAR(0) 1)31+5 Vdc
-CHCK32-S0
GND33-S1
-CMD34M/-IO
CHRDYRTN35+12 Vdc
-CD SFDBK36CD CHRDY
GND37D 00
D 0138D 02
D 0339+5 Vdc
D 0440D 05
GND41D 06
CHRESET42D 07
-SD STROBE 1)43GND
-SDR(0) 1)44-DS 16 RTN
GND45-REFRESH
PHYSICAL KEY46PHYSICAL KEY
Side B (solder)Pin #Side A (component)

Notes:
1) Optional signal. The corresponding pin was marked as "Reserved" in the earlier specifications.


16-bit Section

Side B (solder)Pin #Side A (component)
PHYSICAL KEY47PHYSICAL KEY
D 0848+5 Vdc
D 0949D 10
GND50D 11
D 1251D 13
D 1452+12 Vdc
D 1553DPAR(1) 1)
GND54-SBHE
-IRQ 1055-CD DS 16
-IRQ 1156+5 Vdc
-IRQ 12 57-IRQ 14
GND58-IRQ 15
Side B (solder)Pin #Side A (component)

Notes:
1) Optional signal. The corresponding pin was marked as "Reserved" in the earlier specifications.


32-bit Section

Side B (solder)Pin #Side A (component)
Reserved 2)59Reserved 2)
Reserved 2)60Reserved 2)
-SDR(1) 1)61GND
-MSDR 1)62Reserved
GND63Reserved
D 1664-SFDBKRTN 1)
D 1765+12 Vdc
D 1866D 19
GND67D 20
D 2268D 21
D 2369+5 Vdc
DPAR(2) 1)70D 24
GND71D 25
D 2772D 26
D 2873+5 Vdc
D 2974D 30
GND75D 31
-BE 076DPAR(3) 1)
-BE 177+12 Vdc
-BE 278-BE 3
GND79-DS 32 RTN
TR 3280-CD DS 32
A 2481+5 Vdc 3)
A 2582A 26
GND83A 27
A 2984A 28
A 3085+5 Vdc
A 3186-APAREN 1)
GND87APAR(0) 1)
APAR(2) 1)88APAR(1) 1)
APAR(3) 1)89GND
Side B (solder)Pin #Side A (component)

Notes:
1) Optional signal. The corresponding pin was marked as "Reserved" in the earlier specifications.
2) This is where the 16-bit slot physically ends. Universal 16/32-bit cards will have a cutout in place of these pins. Cards designed exclusively for the 32-bit slot don't have this cutout.
3) This pin was incorrectly marked as +12 Vdc in some early documentation.


Matched-Memory Extension (MME)

Side B (solder)Pin #Side A (component)
GNDM4Reserved
ReservedM3-MMC CMD
-MMCRM2GND
ReservedM1-MMC
Side B (solder)Pin #Side A (component)


Auxiliary Video Extension (AVE)

Side B (solder)Pin #Side A (component)
ESYNCV10VSYNC
GNDV9HSYNC
P5V8BLANK
P4V7GND
P3V6P6
GNDV5EDCLK
P2V4DCLK
P1V3GND
P0V2P7
GNDV1EVIDEO
Side B (solder)Pin #Side A (component)


Base Video Extension (BVE)

Side B (solder)Pin #Side A (component)
ESYNCV10VSYNC
GNDV9HSYNC
P5V8BLANK
P4V7GND
P3V6P6
GNDV5EDCLK
P2V4DCLK
P1V3GND
P0V2P7
GNDV1EVIDEO
PHYSICAL KEY-PHYSICAL KEY
PHYSICAL KEY-PHYSICAL KEY
GNDM4Reserved
ReservedM3-MMC CMD
-MMCRM2GND
ReservedM1-MMC
Side B (solder)Pin #Side A (component)


Micro Channel Buses and Signals

The Micro Channel architecture consists of:

  • An arbitration bus and associated signals
  • An address bus and associated signals
  • A data bus and associated signals
  • Interrupt signals
  • Other Micro Channel signals
  • Optional extensions for:
    • Matched memory extension signals
    • Video extension signals.

Throughout this document, a minus sign (-) in front of a signal name indicates that the signal is active when it is at a low-voltage level. When no minus sign appears, the signal is active when it is at a high-voltage level. For example, -CMD specifies the signal is active low. Also, ARB/-GNT is in the ARB state when it is at a high level and is in the -GNT state when it is at a low level.

All of the logic signal lines are transistor-transistor logic (TTL) compatible.

Reserved: Any signals shown or described as "Reserved" should not be driven or received. These signals are reserved to allow compatibility with future implementations of the channel interface. Serious compatibility problems, loss of data, or permanent damage can result to features or the system if these signals are misused.

Note: Adapter designs should not extend the card-edge connector beyond the basic 16- or 32-bit connector unless the signals provided by the extension are used by the adapter. Adapters for the Micro Channel architecture have special design criteria. See "Micro Channel Adapter Design."


Arbitration Bus and Associated Signals

The arbitration bus and associated signals allow arbitrating participants (the system master, bus masters, and DMA slaves) to request and gain ownership of the channel. The resolution of multiple arbitration requests results in granting ownership of the channel to the highest-priority requester. See "Arbitration" on page 27 for more information.

ARB0 ARB3: Arbitration Bus: These signals make up the arbitration bus. They are driven by the system master, bus masters, and DMA slaves to present their arbitration level when requesting ownership of the channel. ARB0 (least significant) through ARB3 (most-significant) support up to 16 arbitration levels.

The highest value of the arbitration bus (hex F) has the lowest priority, and the lowest value (hex 0) has the highest priority. To participate in the arbitration procedure, an arbitrating participant must present its arbitration level immediately after the rising edge of ARB/-GNT. All arbitrating participants monitor the arbitration bus, and those with lower priority arbitration levels withdraw them by not driving less-significant arbitration bits.

The arbitration level of the highest-priority requester is valid on the arbitration bus after a settling time. After the channel is granted to the highest-priority requester, that requester continues to drive its arbitration level on the bus.

ARB/-GNT: Arbitrate/-Grant: Only the central arbitration control point drives this signal. The negative-to-positive transition of ARB/-GNT initiates an arbitration cycle. When in the ARB state, this signal indicates an arbitration cycle is in progress. When in the -GNT state, this signal indicates the acknowledgment from the central arbitration control point to the arbitrating participants and the DMA controller that channel ownership has been granted. This signal is driven to the ARB state by the central arbitration control point following the end of transfer (EOT). (See page 28 for a description of the end of transfer.)

Note: The system master can perform data transfers during arbitration (ARB/-GNT in the ARB state).

-BURST: -Burst: This signal is optionally driven by the winning arbitrating participant or the DMA controller after ARB/-GNT is driven to the -GNT state. This signal indicates to the central arbitration control point that the controlling master will use the channel for one or more consecutive data transfer cycles. This type of data transfer is called burst transfer.

-PREEMPT: -Preempt: This signal is used by arbitrating participants to request use of the channel through arbitration. Any arbitrating participant that requires ownership of the channel drives -PREEMPT active, causing an arbitration cycle to occur. When a participant is granted control of the channel, it stops driving -PREEMPT. All arbitrating participants that have not been granted ownership keep their requests pending by continuing to drive -PREEMPT active. All masters and DMA slaves that use burst transfer must receive -PREEMPT.


Address Bus and Associated Signals

The address bus and the associated signals are used by the controlling master to assert the memory address or the I/O address (M/-IO), to enable a slave to latch the address and status signals (-S0, -S1), and to indicate that the memory address is greater than 16MB.

A0 A23: Address Bits 0 through 23: These lines, along with A24 through A31, make up the address bus. These lines are driven by the controlling master to address memory, I/O slaves, and, optionally, DMA slaves, A0 is the least-significant bit and A23 is the most-significant bit. These 24 address lines allow access of up to 16MB of memory. Only the lower 16 address lines (A0 through A15) are for I/O operations, and all 16 lines must be decoded by the I/O slave. A0 through A23 are generated by the controlling master. Valid addresses, generated by the controlling master, are unlatched on the channel and, if required, must be latched by the slaves using either the leading or trailing edge of -ADL or the leading edge of -CMD.

A24 A31: Address Bits 24 through 31: These lines, along with A0 through A23 are driven by the controlling master to address memory attached to the channel. A0 is the least-significant bit and A31 is the most-significant bit. These additional address lines allow access of up to 4GB of memory. A24 through A31 are generated by the controlling master. Valid addresses, generated by the controlling master, are unlatched on the channel and, if required, must be latched by the slaves using either the leading or trailing edge of -ADL or the leading edge of -CMD.

Note: A0-A31 are used to transfer data during a 64-bit streaming data cycle.

-ADL: -Address Decode Latch: This signal, driven by the controlling master, is provided as a convenient way for the slave to latch valid address decodes and status bits.

-APAREN: -Address Parity Enable: This optional signal is driven active by a master when the master places an address on the bus. This signal indicates to a slave that the address parity signals are valid.

APAR0 APAR3: Address Parity Bits 0 through 3: These optional signals are driven by a master when an address is placed on the address bus. These signals represent the odd parity of the address bits on the address bus during both read and write operations. (Odd parity is the condition where the total number of 1s in a byte of data, including the parity bit, is odd.)

   APAR(0) represents the odd parity of A(0-7).
   APAR(1) represents the odd parity of A(8-15).
   APAR(2) represents the odd parity of A(16-23).
   APAR(3) represents the odd parity of A(24-31).

During both read and write operations, a master generates a parity bit for each valid address byte, and the receiving slave optionally performs the parity checking to ensure the integrity of the address.

Note: APAR0 - APAR3 represent data parity during 64-bit streaming data cycle when -DPAREN is active.

   APAR(0) represents the odd parity of D(32-39).
   APAR(1) represents the odd parity of D(40-47).
   APAR(2) represents the odd parity of D(48-55).
   APAR(3) represents the odd parity of D(56-63).

-CD SFDBK (n): -Card Selected Feedback: This signal is driven active by the selected slave as a positive acknowledgement of the slave's selection. The (n) indicates this signal is unique to each channel connector (one independent signal per connector). This signal is unlatched and driven by the selected slave. The slave does not drive -CD SFDBK during the configuration procedure (-CD SETUP active).

Note: Memory that contains diagnostic code must not drive -CD SFDBK during the diagnostic operation.

MADE 24: Memory Address Enable 24: This signal is driven by the controlling master and decoded by all memory slaves, regardless of the size of their address-space. When this signal is active, A24 - 31 are undefined.

  • A master driving only A0 - A23 drives MADE 24 active.
  • A master driving A0 - A31 drives MADE 24:
    • Active when all bits in A24 - A31 are 0
    • Inactive when any bit in A24 - A31 is 1.

M/-IO: Memory/-Input Output: This signal is driven by the controlling master and decoded by all slaves. This signal selects a memory cycle or an I/O cycle. When this signal is in the M state, a memory cycle is selected. When this signal is in the -IO state, an I/O cycle is selected.

-SFDBKRTN: Selected Feedback Return: This optional signal is generated by the system logic from the AND of the -CD SFDBK(n) signals being driven by slaves. This signal is a positive acknowledgement to the master from the slave that the slave is at the address specified by the master. Masters that support address parity must receive this signal.


Data Bus and Associated Signals

The data bus is used to transfer either 8, 16, 24, or 32 bits of data. The associated signals indicate the amount of data transferred by the master in a single transfer cycle, the size of the slave's data port, and the type (read or write) of the data transfer.

D0 D15: Data Bits 0 through 15: These lines, along with D16 - D31, make up the data bus. The data bus is driven by any master or slave that is transferring data. These lines (D0 - D15) provide data bits 0 through 15. D0 is the least-significant bit; D15 is the most-significant bit. The 16-bit transfers from the controlling master to an 8-bit slave are converted by the controlling master to two 8-bit transfers, and are transmitted on lines D0 through D7. An 8-bit slave must use D0 through D7 to communicate with the controlling master.

D16 D31: Data Bits 16 through 31: These lines, along with D0 - D15, make up the data bus. The data bus is driven by any master or slave that is transferring data. These lines (D16 - D31) provide data bits 16 through 31. D0 is the least-significant bit; p31 is the most-significant bit. The 32-bit transfers from the controlling master to an 8-bit slave are converted to four 8-bit transfers by the controlling master, and are transmitted on lines D0 through D7. The 32-bit transfers from the controlling master to a 16-bit slave are converted to two 16-bit transfers by the controlling master, and are transmitted on lines D0 through D15.

-BE0 -BE3: -Byte Enable 0 through 3: These signals are used during data transfers with 32-bit slaves to indicate which data bytes are valid on the data bus. Data transfers of 8, 16, 24, or 32 contiguous bits are controlled by -BE0 through -BE3 during transfers involving 32-bit slaves only. These signals are driven by the controlling master when TR 32 is inactive, and by the central translator logic (for those operations involving a 16-bit master with a 32-bit slave) when TR 32 is active. These signals are not latched on the bus and, if required, are latched by 32-bit slaves. (See "Channel Support" on page 55 for additional information.)

-CD DS 16 (n): -Card Data Size 16: This signal is driven by 16-bit and 32-bit slaves to indicate a 16-bit or 32-bit data port at the location addressed. The (n) indicates this signal is unique to each channel connector (one independent signal per connector). This signal is derived from a valid unlatched address decode. -CD DS 16 is not driven by 8-bit slaves and is inactive for an 8-bit data port.

-CD DS 32 (n): -Card Data Size 32: This signal, along with -CD DS 16, is driven by 32-bit slaves to indicate a 32-bit data port at the location addressed. The (n) indicates this signal is unique to a channel connector position (one independent signal per connector). -CD DS 32 is derived from a valid unlatched address decode. -CD DS 32 is inactive for an 8- or 16-bit data port.

CD CHRDY (n): Channel Ready: This signal is normally active (ready) and is driven inactive (not ready) by a slave to allow additional time to complete a channel cycle. The (n) indicates this signal is unique to each channel connector (one independent signal per connector).

During a read cycle, a slave ensures that data is valid within the time specified after releasing the signal to a ready state. The slave also holds the data long enough for the controlling master to sample the data. A slave can also use this signal during a write cycle if more time is needed to store the data. This signal is initially driven from a valid unlatched address decode and status active.

CHRDYRTN: Channel Ready Return: This signal is the AND of CD CHRDY (n). It is driven by the system logic. If all slaves drive CD CHRDY active, this signal is active. CHRDYRTN allows the controlling master to monitor the ready information.

-CMD: -Command: This signal is driven by the controlling master and is used to define when data on the data bus is valid. The trailing edge of this signal indicates the end of the bus cycle. This signal indicates to the slave how long data is valid. During write cycles, the data is valid as long as -CMD is active. During read cycles, the data is valid after the leading edge, but before the trailing edge, of -CMD and is held on the bus until after -CMD goes inactive. Slaves can latch address and status information with the leading edge of -CMD.

-DPAREN: -Data Parity Enable: This optional signal is driven active by the participant when data is placed on the data bus. This signal indicates that the data parity signals are valid.

Note: APAR(0) - APAR(3) represent data parity during 64-bit streaming data cycles when -DPAREN is active.

DPAR0 DPAR1: Data Parity Bits 0 and 1: These optional signals are driven by the participant when data is placed on the data bus. These signals represent the odd parity of the data bits on the data bus during both read and write operations. (Odd parity is the condition where the total number of 1s in a byte of data, including the parity bit, is odd.)

   DPAR(0) represents the odd parity of D(0-7).
   DPAR(1) represents the odd parity of D(8-15).

During write operations, a master generates a parity bit for each data byte being transferred, and the receiving slave optionally performs the parity checking to ensure the integrity of the data. During read operations, a slave generates a parity bit for each valid data byte, and the receiving master performs the parity checking to ensure the integrity of the data.

DPAR2 DPAR3: Data Parity Bits 2 and 3: These optional signals are driven by the participant when data is placed on the data bus. These signals represent the odd parity of the data bits on the data bus during both read and write operations.

   DPAR(2) represents the odd parity of D(16-23).
   DPAR(3) represents the odd parity of D(24-31).

During write operations, a master generates a parity bit for each data byte being transferred, and the receiving slave optionally performs the parity checking to ensure the integrity of the data. During read operations, a slave generates a parity bit for each valid data byte, and the receiving master performs the parity checking to ensure the integrity of the data.

-DS 16 RTN: -Data Size 16 Return: This signal is driven by the system logic. This signal is the AND of -CD DS 16 (n) from each channel connector. If any slave drives its -CD DS 16 active, this signal is active. This signal allows the controlling master to monitor the information about the selected slave's data port size (see Figure 6).

-DS 32 RTN: -Data Size 32 Return: This signal is driven by the system logic. This signal is the AND of -CD DS 32 (n) from each channel connector. If any slave drives its -CD DS 32 active, this signal is active. This signal allows the controlling master to monitor the information about the selected slave's data port size.

-DS 16
RTN
-DS 32
RTN
Data Port Size
118-Bit Data Port
10Not Valid
0116-Bit Data Port
0032-Bit Data Port
Figure 6. Port Size of Selected Slave

-MSDR: -Multiplexed Streaming Data Request: This signal is driven by a slave to indicate to the controlling master that the slave is capable of 64-bit streaming data transfers.

-SBHE: -System Byte High Enable: This signal is driven by the controlling master to indicate and enable transfers of data on D8 - D15. It is used with A0 to distinguish between high-byte transfers (D8 D15) and low-byte transfers (D0 7) and double-byte (16-bit) transfers to 16-bit data ports. All 16-bit slaves receive this signal.

-SD STROBE: -Streaming Data Strobe: The controlling master and the slave use this signal to clock data on and off the data bus. This optional signal is driven by the controlling master. This signal also indicates to the slave that the controlling master supports streaming data.

-SDR(0): -Streaming Data Request 0: This optional signal is driven by a slave to indicate to the controlling master that the slave is capable of streaming data, and also indicates the maximum clocking rate the slave supports.

-SDR(1): -Streaming Data Request 1: This optional signal is driven by a slave to indicate to the controlling master that the slave is capable of streaming data, and also indicates the maximum clocking rate the slave supports.

-SDR(0)-SDR(1)Decoded Streaming Rate
11Basic Transfer Cycle
0110 MHz maximum (100 ns minimum cycle)
10Reserved
00Reserved
Figure 7. Streaming Data Rates

-S0, -S1: -Status 0, -Status 1: These status signals are driven by the controlling master to indicate the start of a data transfer cycle and also define the type of data transfer. When used with M/-IO, memory read or write cycles are distinguished from I/O read or write cycles. These signals are latched by the slave, as required, using the leading edge of -CMD, or the leading or trailing edge of -ADL.

Data is transferred to or from the data bus based on -CMD and a latched decode of the address, the status lines (-S0 exclusive-OR -S1), and M/-IO.

Slaves must support a full decode of -S0 and -S1. The following table shows the states of M/-IO, -S0, and -S1 in decoding I/O and memory read and write commands.

M/
-IO
-S0-S1Function
000Reserved
001I/O Write Command
010I/O Read Command
011Inactive
100Reserved
101Memory Write Command
110Memory Read Command
111Inactive
Figure 8. I/O and Memory Transfer Controls

An I/O write command instructs an I/O slave to receive the data from the data bus. An I/O read command instructs an I/O slave to drive its data onto the data bus.

A memory write command instructs a memory slave to receive the data from the data bus. A memory read command instructs a memory slave to drive its data onto the data bus.

-TC: -Terminal Count: This signal is driven by the DMA controller and provides a pulse during a read or write command to the DMA slave to indicate that the terminal count of the current DMA channel has been reached. This indicates to the DMA slave that this is the last cycle to be performed. -TC is driven active on the channel during DMA operations only.

TR 32: Translate 32: This signal is driven inactive by 32-bit controlling masters and received by the central translator logic. The signal indicates to the central translator logic that the controlling master is performing data steering. TR 32 can also be received by any 32-bit slave. See "Data Steering" on page 53 for information about the central translator logic.


Interrupt Signals

-IRQ 37, -IRQ 912, and -IRQ 1415: -Interrupt Request: An interrupt request is generated when an I/O slave drives one of the 'interrupt request' signals low. These signals make up the set of interrupt signals. The polarity of these signals makes it possible for multiple slaves to concurrently share the same interrupt level.


Other Micro Channel Signals

AUDIO: Audio Sum Node: This analog signal is the sum of all the audio signals being driven. It is used to drive audio signals from an adapter to the system audio output and between adapters. The frequency response of the audio signal is 50 Hz to 10 kHz 3 dB. The maximum signal amplitude is 2.5 Vac peak-to-peak, at a dc offset of 0.0 Vdc 50 millivolts. The noise level is limited to a maximum of 50 millivolts peak-to-peak.

AUDIO GND: Audio Ground: This is the analog ground return signal for the audio subsystem.

-CD SETUP (n): -Card Setup: This signal is driven by system logic to individually select channel connectors. The (n) indicates this signal is unique to each channel connector (one independent signal per connector). When this signal is activated, a specific channel connector is selected, and, if an adapter is present, access is gained to configuration data at that connector. The adapter ID and configuration data is obtained by an I/O read during a setup cycle; the configuration data is stored by an I/O write during a setup cycle.

-CHCK: -Channel Check: This signal is driven active by a slave to report an exception condition, and optionally, it can be driven by a master.

CHRESET: Channel Reset: This signal is generated by the system logic to reset or initialize all adapters at power-on or when a low voltage condition is detected. The system can also activate this signal under program control.

OSC: Oscillator: This signal is a high-speed clock driven by the system logic, with a frequency of 14.31818 MHz 0.01%. The high-level pulse width (more than 2.3 Vdc) and the low-level pulse width (less than 0.8 Vdc) must not be less than 20 nanoseconds each.

-REFRESH: -Refresh: This signal is driven by the system logic and is used to indicate that a memory refresh operation is in progress. Memory slaves that do not need to perform refresh operations do not need to receive this signal.


Channel Signal Groups (Digital)

The following figure lists the digital Micro Channel signals and shows what type of driver or receiver is required. The 'audio' and 'audio ground' signals are analog signals. (For further information about these signals, see page 19.)

When a Micro Channel adapter combines the functions of bus masters and slaves, the signals driven and received by the adapter are a superset of the selected functions.

For example:

  • An adapter that combines a slave function with a bus master function must drive and receive all signals required by a slave and all signals required by a bus master.
  • An adapter that combines an I/O slave function with a memory slave or DMA slave function, must drive and receive all signals required by both slaves.

Note: All adapters must support setup.

The central arbitration control point, central steering logic, and central translator logic are packaged within the system logic. The system logic also includes circuitry for memory refresh, the oscillator, and channel reset.

The signals for the 16-bit adapter are a subset of the signals for the 32-bit adapter.

Signal NameSystem
Master
DMA
Cntlr
Bus
Master
DMA
Slave
Memory
Slave
I/O
Slave
Driver
Type
D/RD/RD/RD/RD/RD/RSignal
Group
A(0-15)D/-D/-D/--/O-/R-/RTS (1)
A(16-23)D/-D/-D/--/--/R-/-TS (1)
A(24-31)*/-*/-*/--/--/*-/-TS (1)
-ADLD/-D/-D/--/O-/O-/OTS (1)
APAR(0-3)O/-O/-O/--/O-/O-/OTS (2)
-APARENO/-O/-O/--/O-/O-/OTS (2)
ARB(0-3)O/O-/RD/RD/R-/--/-OC (5)
ARB/-GNTD/--/R-/R-/R-/--/-BD (4)
-BE(0-3)*/-*/-*/--/*-/*-/*TS (1)
-BURSTO/RD/RO/-O/--/O-/OOC (5)
CD CHRDY (n)-/R-/--/-O/-O/-O/-TP (3)
-CD DS 16 (n)-/R-/--/-$/-$/-$/-TP (3)
-CD DS 32 (n)-/*-/--/-*/-*/-*/-TP (3)
-CD SETUP (n)D/--/@-/@-/@-/@-/@TP (8)
-CD SFDBK (n)-/R-/--/-D/-D/-D/-TP (3)
-CHCK-/RO/RO/RO/-O/-O/-OC (6)
CHRDYRTND/--/R-/R-/--/--/-BD (4)
CHRESETD/--/R-/R-/R-/R-/RBD (4)
-CMDD/-D/-D/--/R-/R-/RTS (1)
D(0-7)D/RD/RD/RD/RD/RD/RTS (2)
D(8-15)D/RD/RD/R$/$$/$$/$TS (2)
D(16-31)*/**/**/**/**/**/*TS (2)
DPAR(0)O/OO/OO/OO/OO/OO/OTS (2)
DPAR(1)O/OO/OO/OO/OO/OO/OTS (2)
DPAR(2-3)O/OO/OO/OO/OO/OO/OTS (2)
-DPARENO/OO/OO/OO/OO/OO/OTS (2)
-DS 16 RTND/--/R-/R-/--/--/-BD (4)
-DS 32 RTN*/--/*-/*-/--/--/-BD (4)
-IRQ (N)O/RO/-O/OO/-O/-O/-OC (6)
M/-IOD/-D/-D/--/R-/R-/RTS (1)
MADE 24D/-D/-D/--/--/R-/-TS (1)
-MSDR-/O-/O-/OO/-O/-O/-TS (1)
OSCD/--/O-/O-/O-/O-/OCD (7)
-PREEMPTD/R-/-D/OD/O-/--/-OC (5)
-REFRESHD/--/--/--/--/O-/-TS (1)
-S0,-S1D/*D/-D/--/R-/R-/RTS (1)
-SBHED/*D/-D/--/#-/#-/#TS (1)
-SFDBKRTNO/--/O-/O-/--/--/-BD (4)
-SD STROBEO/-O/-O/--/O-/O-/OTS (1)
-SDR(0)-/O-/O-/OO/-O/-O/-TS (1)
-SDR(1)-/O-/O-/OO/-O/-O/-TS (1)
-TC-/-D/--/--/R-/--/-TS (1)
TR 32*/R*/-*/--/O-/O-/OTS (1)
Figure 9. Driver and Receiver Requirements and Options

Legend:

D = Drive Enabled
R = Receive Enabled
O = Optional
# = Required for 16-bit devices
$ = Required for 16- or 32-bit devices
* = Required for 32-bit devices
- = Not Implemented
@ = -CD SETUP is received by all adapters

OC = Open Collector
TS = Tri-State
TP = Totem Pole
BD = Bus Driver
CD = Clock Driver

N = IRQ(9-12,14,15,3-7)


Matched-Memory Extension Signal Descriptions

The matched-memory extension can, in some cases, improve the data transfer capabilities between the system master and channel-resident memory. The matched-memory signal-sequence and signal-timing specifications are system dependent. For more information, see the technical manuals for the systems that support the matched-memory signals.

-MMC: -Matched Memory Cycle: This signal is driven by the system logic to indicate to the channel slaves that the system microprocessor is the controlling master and is able to run a matched-memory cycle.

-MMCR: -Matched Memory Cycle Request: This is a bus cycle control-input signal. -MMCR is driven by a 16- or 32-bit channel slave to request the faster cycle available on the system bus.

-MMC CMD: -Matched Memory Cycle Command: This output signal to the bus is generated for system microprocessor bus cycles only.

-MMC CMD defines when data is valid on the bus during a matched-memory cycle.


Auxiliary Video Extension Signal Descriptions

The auxiliary video extension allows optional video adapters to share video resources with the base video subsystem. The base video can be on the system board or on an adapter with the base video extension. When the base video subsystem is on the system board, support of the auxiliary video extension is direct. When the base video subsystem is on an adapter, support of the auxiliary video extension is through the base video extension. The signals and signal timings for the auxiliary and base video extensions are system dependent.

The following are signal descriptions for the auxiliary video extension of the channel connector.

VSYNC: Vertical Synchronization: This signal is the vertical synchronization signal to the display. See also the ESYNC description.

HSYNC: Horizontal Synchronization: This signal is the horizontal synchronization signal to the display. See also the ESYNC description.

BLANK: Blanking Signal: This signal is connected to the BLANK input of the video digital-to-analog converter (DAC). When active (0 Vdc), this signal tells the DAC to drive its analog color outputs to 0 Vdc. See also the ESYNC description.

P0 - P7: Palette Bits: These eight signals contain video information and comprise the picture element (PEL) address inputs to the video DAC. See also the EVIDEO description.

DCLK: Dot Clock: This signal is the PEL clock used by the DAC to latch the digital video signals, P7 through P0. The signals are latched into the DAC on the rising edge of DCLK.

This signal is driven through the EXTCLK input to the system board video when DCLK is driven by the adapter. If an adapter is providing the clock, it must also provide the video data to the DAC. See the EDCLK description.

ESYNC: External Synchronization: This signal is the output-enable signal for the buffer that drives BLANK, VSYNC, and HSYNC. ESYNC is tied to +5 Vdc through a pull-up resistor. When ESYNC is high, the system board video drives BLANK, VSYNC, and HSYNC. When ESYNC is pulled low, the adapter drives BLANK,VSYNC, and HSYNC.

EVIDEO: External Video: This signal is the output-enable signal for the buffer that drives P7 through P0. EVIDEO is tied to + 5 Vdc through a pull-up resistor. When EVIDEO is high, the system board video drives P7 through P0. When it is pulled low, the adapter drives P7 through P0.

EDCLK: External Dot Clock: This signal is the output-enable signal for the buffer that drives DCLK. EDCLK is tied to +5 Vdc through a pull-up resistor. When EDCLK is high, the system board video is the source of DCLK to the DAC and the adapter. When EDCLK is pulled low, the adapter drives DCLK.

See "Video Subsystem" for more information.


Micro Channel Architecture Base and Extensions

Figure 11 On page 25 shows the buses and signals available for use with the 32-bit connector. The optional extensions signals are shown at the top of the figure and the optional connector pins at the bottom of the figure. Figure 12 on page 26 shows the buses and signals available for use with the 16-bit connector. The optional extensions signals are shown at the top of the figure and the optional connector pins at the bottom of the figure. The 16-bit connector is a subset of the 32-bit connector.

"Connector Definition" on page 142 contains the physical specifications for the connectors.


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